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Regular version of the site
Book
Heidegger on Technology

Routledge, 2018.

Article
Translation of Boris Hessen's "Preface to Articles by A. Einstein and J.J. Thomson"

Winkler S. P.

Society and Politics. 2019. Vol. 13. No. 1. P. 87-102.

Book chapter
Relationships as Foundations of Practical Philosophy: J.F. Herbart’s Realism and I. Kant’s Transcendental Freedom

Moro N.

In bk.: XII Кантовские чтения. Кант и этика Просвещения: исторические основания и современное значение = 12th Kant-Readings. Kant and the Ethics of Enlightenment: Historical Roots and Contemporary Relevance : тез. докл. междунар. науч. конф.. Kaliningrad: 2019. P. 103-104.

Working paper
In Search of the New European Past: Rewriting History in the First Person Singular

Zaretsky Y.

Social Science Research Network. Social Science Research Network. SSRN, 2019

What Do We Talk About When We Talk About Photography

An international conference entitled "What Do We Talk About When We Talk About Photography" was held at the HSE, December 11-13.

The conference brought together experts in various fields – philosophy, cultural studies, history of photography and art. 

Associate Professor Andrew Haas gave a lecture entitled, “Four Theses on Photography”. Haas argued that, first, the origin of photography is improvisation; but improvisation does not mean simply “free play” or following desire, inspiration, God or the gods, etc.--rather, as the Greeks knew, improvisation means self-schematization.Second, Haas showed that, as a kind of “light-writing,” photography does not simply illuminate because it writes with light; it writes with light because it is illuminating--and yet illumination is not simply lighting up, switching on, nor opening up to catch what is lit, nor merely representing what is present (to the eye or mind, real or not), nor just seeing and capturing that which is already in the light, or noticing and bringing to light (and so to presence) that which is in darkness; rather, illuminating is a way of being implicated in the illuminated. Third, Haas demonstrated that what is illuminated in the photograph is neither present nor absent (unlike in representation, where the represented comes to presence—out of absence—presents itself as itself or as another): we can no longer think of the relation of photograph to photographed as that of copy to original, representation to object, sign to referent; on the contrary, what is illuminated by photography is what is only implied, an implication; which is why that which photography implies, the implication it cannot just illuminate, remains a problem.Finally, Haas argued that the end of photography is problematizing how to take up the task of illuminating that which the photograph implies: on the one hand, the problem could be translated into the language of necessity (the photograph must illuminate something, even if it is only implied); on the other hand, it might be translated into a language of possibility (the photograph only illuminates what is possibly implied)--but there is a third, namely, the illumination of implication as problematic, and photography as the problematization of illumination, which might mean the problematization of photography itself.